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The Land of Foam also known as At the Edge of Oikoumene (Russian: На краю Ойкумены, Na krayu Oikumeny) and Great Arc (Великая Дуга, Velikaya Duga) is a novel written by the Soviet writer Ivan Yefremov in 1946. Plot summary The novel is divided in two parts, separated by more than 1000 years. The first part takes place during the rule of the pharaon Djedefra (XXVIth century BC), who decides to send an expedition to the South, in order to seek the famous and fabled Land of Punt and to seek the limits of the land and the start of the Great Arc, the circular ocean encompassing the entire world in Egyptian cosmology. The second part starts in Ancient Greece during its Aegean Period (no precise dates are provided, but one can assume a date circa 1000-900 BC)[1]. A young sculptor named Pandion sets off on a journey to Crete, but a storm finally lands him in Egypt, where he is enslaved. From that point, he is haunted by the thought of coming back home... Notes ^ The book mentions the abandoned capital of Akhetaten, constructed by the pharaoh of same name c. 1350 BC and abandoned shortly afterwards. Those facts are place as 400 years away at the time the novel takes place. External links The Land of Foam by Ivan Yefremov in the Udmurt mirror of the Maksim Moshkow's Library v · d · eWorks by Ivan Yefremov Novels The Land of Foam (1946) · Andromeda (1957) · Razor's Edge (1963) · The Bull's Hour (1968) · Thais of Athens (1972) Short stories "A Meeting Over Tuscarora" (1944) · "Olgoi-Khorkhoi" (1944) · "Cutty Sark" (1944) · "Stellar Ships" (1947) · "Hell's Fire" (1948) · "The Yurt of the Raven" (1958) · "The Heart of the Serpent" (1958) · "Aphaneor, The Arkharkhellen's Daughter" (1959) · "Five Paintings" (1965) Non-fiction Road of Winds (1956) This article about a novel is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.v · d · e