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"MKV" redirects here. For the planned U.S. missile defense program, see Multiple Kill Vehicle. For other uses, see Matryoshka (disambiguation). For MKV (Student Organisation), see Mittelschüler-Kartellverband. Matroska Filename extension .mkv .mka .mks Internet media type video/x-matroska audio/x-matroska Developed by Matroska.org Type of format Container format Container for Multimedia Open format? Yes: GNU LGPL The Matroska Multimedia Container is an open standard free container format, a file format that can hold an unlimited number of video, audio, picture or subtitle tracks inside a single file.[1] It is intended to serve as a universal format for storing common multimedia content, like movies or TV shows. Matroska is similar in concept to other containers like AVI, MP4 or ASF, but is entirely open in specification, with implementations consisting mostly of open source software. Matroska file types are .MKV for video (with subtitles and audio), .MKA for audio-only files and .MKS for subtitles only. Matroska is an English word derived from the Russian word Matryoshka (Russian: матрёшка [mɐˈtrʲoʂkə]), which means nesting doll (the common Russian cylindrical-shaped doll within a doll, also known as a babushka doll). This is a play on the container (media within a form of media/doll within a doll) aspect of the matryoshka as it is a container for visual and audio data. The loose transliteration may be confusing for Russian speakers, as the Russian word matroska (Russian: матроска) actually refers to a sailor suit. Contents 1 History 2 Goals 3 Software support 3.1 Media players 3.2 Media centers 3.3 Tools 4 Hardware support 4.1 Asus 4.2 Oppo 4.3 Samsung 4.4 LG 4.5 Sharp 4.6 Other Blu-ray players 4.7 Sigma Designs 4.8 Realtek 4.9 Cowon 4.10 Archos 4.11 RAmos 4.12 Popcorn Hour 4.13 Nokia 5 License 6 See also 7 References 8 External links // History The project was announced on 6 December 2002[2] as a fork of the Multimedia Container Format (MCF), after disagreements between MCF lead developer Lasse Kärkkäinen and soon-to-be Matroska founder Steve Lhomme about the use of the Extensible Binary Meta Language (EBML) instead of a binary format.[citation needed] This coincided with a long coding break by the MCF's lead developer, during which most of the community quickly migrated to the new project.[citation needed] In 2010, it was announced that the WebM container format would be based on a profile of the Matroska container format together with the VP8 video and Vorbis audio formats.[3] Goals This section is missing citations or needs footnotes. Please help add inline citations to guard against copyright violations and factual inaccuracies. (March 2010) The use of EBML provides extendability for future format changes. The Matroska team has openly expressed some of their long term goals on Doom9.org and hydrogenaudio.org. Thus, the following are "goals",[4] not necessarily existing features, of Matroska: creating a modern, flexible, extensible, cross-platform multimedia container format; developing robust streaming support; developing a menu system similar to that of DVDs based on EBML (this feature seems to have been abandoned); developing a set of tools for the creation and editing of Matroska files; developing libraries that can be used to allow developers to add Matroska support to their applications; working with hardware manufacturers to include Matroska support in embedded multimedia devices; working to provide native Matroska support in various operating systems and hardware platforms. Software support Listed below is software that has native Matroska support. Media players Name OS SSA/ASS Support ALLPlayer Windows Yes BS.Player Windows Yes Chameleo Cross-platform No CorePlayer Cross-platform No DivX Player for Mac Mac OS X Yes DivX Plus Player Windows Yes DivX Plus Web Player Cross-platform Yes GOM Player Windows Yes Gstreamer-based Players (Totem, etc.) Cross-platform Yes jetAudio Windows Yes K-Multimedia Player Windows Yes Kantaris Windows No PowerDVD Windows Yes TotalMedia Theatre Windows No Media Player Classic Windows Yes Media Player Classic Home Cinema Windows Yes MPlayer Cross-platform Yes MPlayer Extended Mac OS X Yes ShowTime Windows No SMPlayer Cross-platform Yes The Core Pocket Media Player Windows Mobile No Totem Unix-like Yes VLC media player Cross-platform Yes Winamp Windows No xine Cross-platform Yes Media centers Name OS Boxee Cross-platform MediaPortal[5] Windows Moovida Cross-platform MythTV Linux Plex Mac OS X PS3 Media Server Cross-platform XBMC Cross-platform Tools Name OS Avidemux Cross-platform DivX Plus Converter (DivX Plus HD) Windows HandBrake[6] Cross-platform FFmpeg Cross-platform FormatFactory[7] Windows LiVES Cross-platform MediaCoder Windows Perian Quicktime Plugin for Mac OS X[8] Mac OS X PiTiVi Linux SUPER Windows Total video converter Windows VirtualDubMod Windows GDSmux (part of haali media splitter) Windows XMedia Recode Windows Hardware support Asus The O!Play family of set-top media players support Matroska container.[9] Oppo Two of OPPO Digital's Blu-ray players, the BDP-83[10] and BDP-80,[11] support Matroska files streamed over the network, or from USB. Samsung Starting in 2009 Samsung added Matroska support to its Blu-ray players from series 5 to series 7 HDTVs.[12] LG LG has added Matroska support to Blu-ray players[13] as well as select HDTVs[14] Sharp The Sharp AQUOS Quattron range of LED/LCD TV's have .mkv support via their USB input. Other Blu-ray players The Allure 500-BD Blu-ray player, a house brand sold by Rick Hart and Clive Peeters in Australia, plays Matroska files. The Samsung BDP-3600 supports it with firmware 2.02 and above. Sigma Designs Sigma Designs produces systems-on-chip for OEMs. Several of the devices which use these chips support the Matroska format. Examples are:[15] Conceptronic Gigabit Full HD Media Player (Sigma Designs SMP8635LF chipset)[16] Western Digital WD TV (1st Gen.) (Sigma 8635 chipset)[17] Western Digital WD TV (2nd Gen.) and Live (Sigma SMP8655 Secure Media Processor)[18] Realtek Realtek RTD1073 or RTD1283 series are usually paired with Matroska support: Noontec V9 FULL HD[19] AC Ryan Playon!DVR-HD[20] AC Ryan Playon!HD[21] AC Ryan Playon!HD Mini[21] Xtreamer[22] Dark Media Mania[23] Cowon Both the Cowon A3[24] and the O2[25] support the Matroska container. Archos The Archos 5 Internet Tablet (Google Android based) supports the Matroska container.[26] It is the first Archos portable media device to do so.[citation needed] RAmos The RAmos T11RK and T12 portable media players support the Matroska container. Multiple embedded subtitles are supported in the .srt format, as are multiple audio tracks, in AC3, AAC, MP3 or DTS. They are both based on the Rockchip RK2806 chipset.[citation needed] Popcorn Hour The two most recent products from NMT and Sybas Technology are the C-200 and the A-200, both of which are fully compatible with the Matroska container. Nokia The Nokia N8 has Matroska format compatibility right out of the box. License Although CoreCodec owns the copyrights and trademarks for the Matroska specification, the specifications are open to everybody. The Matroska project is an open standard which is free to use and the technical specifications are available for both private and commercial use. The Matroska development team licenses its libraries under the LGPL, in addition there are parsing and playback libraries available under BSD licenses.[4] See also Free software portal Combined Community Codec Pack Comparison of container formats Open source codecs and containers SubStation Alpha (SSA/ASS Subtitles) References ^ Matroska Format Specifications, Matroska.org. ^ "Matroska: Older Archives". http://www.matroska.org/news/archives2.html. Retrieved 9 September 2009.  ^ Frequently Asked Questions, the WebM project ^ a b http://www.matroska.org/technical/whatis/index.html ^ MediaPortal Features (01/01/2007) ^ "HandBrake". http://handbrake.fr/.  ^ "FormatFactory". http://www.formatoz.com/.  ^ Perian details ^ ASUS Digital Media Player ^ Oppodigital.com OPPO BDP-83 Blue-ray Disc Player ^ Oppodigital.com OPPO BDP-80 Blue-ray Disc Player - Features and Specifications ^ Gizmodo.com, Samsung's 2009 HDTV Lineup Leaked ^ LG BD370 LG High Definition Disc Player. ^ Asia.cnet.com How to select the right LG HDTV ^ Of course, the components used to build a given consumer electronics device are normally "internal details". Even if they happen to be known (and even if this occurs through information published by the manufacturer itself) there is normally no guarantee that they will remain the same with different releases of the hardware. So what the list which follows, here, means is just that the mentioned devices are known to have at some point in time used a chipset by Sigma Design and supported the Matroska format. The corresponding reference tells how this piece of information was obtained (spec sheet, third-party review where the device was physically disassembled, etc.). ^ "Gigabit Full HD Media Player". http://www.conceptronic.net/site/desktopdefault.aspx?tabid=232&cid=30&pid=CFULLHDMAi. Retrieved 2010-03-08.  ^ "Western Digital's WD TV HD Media Player: Break out the popcorn". The Tech Report. March 12, 2009. http://techreport.com/articles.x/16565. Retrieved 2010-03-06.  ^ "Inside the WD TV Live Media Player". Legit Reviews. November 2, 2009. http://www.legitreviews.com/article/1118/2/. Retrieved 2010-03-12.  ^ Hersheng.com, specification page ^ Playondvr.com, specification page ^ a b Playonhd.com, specification page ^ Xtreamer.net, specification page ^ Akortek.net, specification page ^ Cowonglobal.com Product Spec ^ Cowonglobal.com Product Page ^ Archos.com External links Official Matroska Homepage v • d • e Multimedia compression and container formats Video compression ISO/IEC MJPEG · Motion JPEG 2000 · MPEG-1 · MPEG-2 (Part 2) · MPEG-4 (Part 2/ASP · Part 10/AVC) · HEVC ITU-T H.120 · H.261 · H.262 · H.263 · H.264 · HEVC Others AVS · Bink · CineForm · Cinepak · Dirac · DV · Indeo · Microsoft Video 1 · OMS Video · Pixlet · RealVideo · RTVideo · SheerVideo · Smacker · Sorenson Video & Sorenson Spark · Theora · VC-1 · VC-2 · VC-3 · VP3 · VP6 · VP7 · VP8 · WMV Audio compression ISO/IEC MPEG-1 Layer III (MP3) · MPEG-1 Layer II (Multichannel) · MPEG-1 Layer I · AAC · HE-AAC · MPEG Surround · MPEG-4 ALS · MPEG-4 SLS · MPEG-4 DST · MPEG-4 HVXC · MPEG-4 CELP ITU-T G.711 · G.718 · G.719 · G.722 · G.722.1 · G.722.2 · G.723 · G.723.1 · G.726 · G.728 · G.729 · G.729.1 Others AC-3 · AMR · AMR-WB · AMR-WB+ · Apple Lossless · ATRAC · CELT · DRA · DTS · EVRC · EVRC-B · FLAC · GSM-HR · GSM-FR · GSM-EFR · iLBC · iSAC · Monkey's Audio · TTA (True Audio) · MT9 · A-law · μ-law · Musepack · Nellymoser · OptimFROG · OSQ · QCELP · RealAudio · RTAudio · SD2 · SHN · SILK · Siren · SMV · Speex · SVOPC · TwinVQ · VMR-WB · Vorbis · WavPack · WMA Image compression ISO/IEC/ITU-T JPEG · JPEG 2000 · JPEG XR · lossless JPEG · JBIG · JBIG2 · PNG Others APNG · BMP · DjVu · EXR · GIF · ICER · ILBM · MNG · PCX · PGF · TGA · QTVR · TIFF · WBMP · WebP Media containers ISO/IEC MPEG-PS · MPEG-TS · ISO base media file format · MPEG-4 Part 14 · Motion JPEG 2000 · MPEG-21 Part 9 ITU-T H.222.0 · T.802 Others 3GP and 3G2 · AMV · ASF · AIFF · AVI · AU · Bink · DivX Media Format · DPX · EVO · Flash Video · GXF · M2TS · Matroska · MXF · Ogg · QuickTime File Format · RealMedia · REDCODE RAW · RIFF · Smacker · MOD and TOD · VOB · WAV · WebM See Compression methods for methods and Compression software implementations for codecs