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The topic of this article may not meet the notability guideline for biographies. Please help to establish notability by adding reliable, secondary sources about the topic. If notability cannot be established, the article is likely to be merged, redirected, or deleted. (August 2010) Nelson Cunningham is an American lawyer and political advisor. He spent much of his childhood in Latin America,[1] where he became fluent in Spanish.[1][2] He attended Yale College (class of 1980[3]) and Stanford Law School, where he edited the law review.[1][2] He subsequently worked for Hale and Dorr,[4] a private law firm in Boston.[5] In 1988,[citation needed] he was hired by Rudolph Giuliani to serve as federal prosecutor in New York.[1][6] In 1994-95,[4] he served as General Counsel of the Senate Judiciary Committee under then-chairman Joseph R. Biden.[1][6] He served on the White House staff under President Bill Clinton as Special Advisor to the President for Western Hemisphere affairs[1][6][7] and advised John Kerry's 2004 presidential campaign on foreign policy and trade issues.[2] He was also a member of the Obama-Biden transition team after their electoral victory in 2008.[2] In 1998,[4] he co-founded Kissinger McLarty Associates (KMA), where he served as managing partner, a role he continues at McLarty Associates, one of the two successors to KMA. McLarty is a Washington, D.C.-based strategic advisory firm that advises companies on government and strategic issues around the world.[2] As of 2009, he serves on several boards, including the Institute of the Americas, the Business Council for International Understanding, the American Security Project, and the US-India Business Council. He also chairs the New Democratic Network's Latin America Policy Initiative and is a member of the Yale President's Council on International Activities and the United States Department of State's Advisory Committee on International Economic Policy.[2] Notes ^ a b c d e f Nelson Cunningham, Truman National Security Project. Retrieved 2010-08-27. ^ a b c d e f Managing Political Risk 2009 - Speaker Biographies, The Fletcher School, Tufts University, 2009. Retrieved 2010-08-27. ^ Paul Needham, http://www.yaledailynews.com/news/university-news/2009/04/02/yale-corporation-candidates-announced/, Yale Daily News, 2009-04-02. Retrieved 2010-08-27. ^ a b c Cunningham, Nelson, opensecrets.org (Center for Responsive Politics). Retrieved 2010-08-27. ^ Reputation, Wilmer Cutler Pickering Hale and Dorr LLP (successor firm to Hale and Dorr). Retrieved 2010-08-27. ^ a b c The United States & Colombia: What comes next?, Center for American Progress; biographical note for a July 18, 2006 event. Retrieved 2010-08-27. ^ Cunningham, Nelson, opensecrets.org (Center for Responsive Politics), retrieved 2010-08-27, gives the dates 1995-98, and erroneously refers to the position as "Senate Executive Office of the President Committee" rather than "Executive Office of the President". Cunningham's own page on LinkedIn, retrieved 2010-08-27, says he served as "Special Advisor to the President, Office of Special Envoy for the Americas" in 1997–1998 Persondata Name Cunningham, Nelson Alternative names Short description Date of birth Place of birth Date of death Place of death