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Kenny Williams Center fielder Born: April 6, 1964 (1964-04-06) (age 47) Berkeley, California Batted: Right Threw: Right  MLB debut September 2, 1986 for the Chicago White Sox Last MLB appearance October 4, 1991 for the Montreal Expos Career statistics Batting average     .218 Hits     252 RBI     119 Teams As Player Chicago White Sox (1986–1989) Detroit Tigers (1989-1990) Toronto Blue Jays (1990–1991) Montreal Expos (1991) As General Manager Chicago White Sox (2000–present) Career highlights and awards 2005 World Series Kenneth Royal Williams (born April 6, 1964 in Berkeley, California) is a former outfielder in Major League Baseball and the current general manager of the Chicago White Sox. Williams graduated from Mount Pleasant High School in East San Jose, California in 1982; while in high school, he excelled in football. He also played football at Stanford University before leaving to become a professional baseball player. Contrary to some reports, he was not on the field for The Play, the infamous final play of the 1982 Cal–Stanford game. Contents 1 Biography 1.1 Playing career 1.2 Administrative career 1.2.1 General Manager 1.3 Personal life 2 References 3 External links Biography Playing career Selected by the White Sox in the 3rd round of the 1982 amateur draft, Williams made his debut in 1986 and spent three years in Chicago, primarily as a center fielder, before being traded to the Detroit Tigers in 1989. The Tigers waived him during the 1990 season, and he was claimed by the Toronto Blue Jays. Williams remained a bit player with the Blue Jays, usually coming on as a pinch-runner due to his speed. He was the starting center fielder when Dave Stieb threw his only no-hitter, the first no-hitter in Toronto history. He is best remembered as a player for a bizarre incident during the 1990 season, where a series of wild throwing errors resulted in him (on base as a pinch-runner) rounding third base and mauling over third base coach John McLaren, knocking him out in the process (Williams himself was winded, but eventually ended up scoring the run). This humorous clip would be played over and over in blooper reels for years to come. The Blue Jays then put him on waivers during the 1991 season, with Canada's other major league team, the Montreal Expos, picking him up. Williams decided to retire from baseball after being released by Montreal following the 1991 season. Administrative career In November 1992, Williams rejoined the White Sox organization as a scout. Named special assistant to Sox chairman Jerry Reinsdorf in 1994, he spent some time as a studio analyst for Sox games on SportsChannel Chicago before becoming the team's director of minor league operations in 1995. In 1997, he was named vice-president of player development, a position in which he remained until 2000. General Manager In November 2000, Williams replaced Ron Schueler as the general manager of the White Sox; he hired popular former Chicago shortstop Ozzie Guillén as the team's manager in 2003. Since becoming the White Sox GM, Williams has become known for his aggressive moves to bolster the Sox lineup. This reputation was strengthened following the 2004 season, when Williams completely made over the White Sox team by switching its on-field focus from home runs to pitching, defense, and speed. Accordingly, he acquired players which excelled in these areas, through free agent signings (Orlando Hernández, Dustin Hermanson, Jermaine Dye, A. J. Pierzynski, Tadahito Iguchi), trades (Scott Podsednik, José Contreras, Freddy Garcia) and the farm system (Joe Crede, Aaron Rowand). Williams' off-season maneuvers were reflected in an extremely successful 2005 campaign for the South Siders, one in which they held the best record in all of baseball for most of the year, finished with the best record in the AL to clinch their first AL Central Division title since 2000, their first American League pennant since 1959, and their first World Series since 1917. On February 27, 2006, Williams lashed out at former White Sox first baseman Frank Thomas in an interview with a Chicago television media outlet, in response to statements Thomas made about the White Sox organization. He referred to Thomas as "an idiot" and "selfish" and said no one in the White Sox organization would miss him. In the offseason prior to the 2006 season, Williams set out to improve his world championship team further by acquiring pitcher Javier Vazquez from the Arizona Diamondbacks and slugger Jim Thome from the Philadelphia Phillies. In addition, Williams was cognizant of the large role that the bench played under Ozzie Guillén and solidified it by trading for Rob Mackowiak and Alex Cintron. Because of these aggressive maneuvers, the White Sox were once again favored to win the 2006 World Series. Despite winning 90 games, they fell short and finished in third place in the AL Central Division behind the Detroit Tigers and Minnesota Twins, thereby not making the playoffs. At the All-Star break, however, the White Sox were tied with the Detroit Tigers for first place and held a 6-game lead on the New York Yankees for the wild card. The lead evaporated in the second half of the season and the White Sox finished third in the central behind the Minnesota Twins and Tigers. In the offseason before the 2007 season, Williams traded away Freddy Garcia to the Phillies and acquired prospects, Gavin Floyd and Gio Gonzalez, in return.[1] He also signed veteran free agent Darin Erstad to a one-year $1 million contract.[2] Williams has also stated that the team needs to get younger and improve its scouting. In early January 2008, he traded Gio Gonzalez, Fautino de los Santos, and Ryan Sweeney for Nick Swisher. With pitcher Jake Peavy being acquired at the trade deadline for the 2009 season Williams was referred to by Gordon Edes of Yahoo Sports as a "stealth bomber" for his under the radar moves.[3] On August 10, 2009, Williams made another under the radar move, by claiming OF Alex Rios off the waivers from the Toronto Blue Jays. Personal life Kenny and his wife, Jessica, reside in Naperville, Illinois. The family of 7 includes Arizona State University football player Kyle Williams, a 2006 draftee of the White Sox and Wichita State University baseball player Kenny Williams Jr., a 2008 draftee of the White Sox. Kenny is renowned and often teased by organization members and players for his structured lifestyle and particular eating habits. It has been reported that Kenny has eaten a peanut butter and jelly sandwich for lunch every day for the past nine years. [4] More recent interviews show Williams indicating that this may be an exaggeration. [5] References ^ ESPN - White Sox trade Garcia to Phillies for Floyd - MLB ^ ESPN - ChiSox, Erstad agree to $1M, one-year contract - MLB ^ Yahoo Sports - Winners and Lossers of 2009 Trade deadline - MLB ^ Windy city Dealer ^ Sports Illustratedd - a Football Man in a Baseball World External links Career statistics and player information from Baseball-Reference White Sox official biography Analysis from RealGM Sporting positions Preceded by Ron Schueler Chicago White Sox General Manager 2000-present Succeeded by Incumbent v · d · eMajor League Baseball general managers by team American League East Division Andy MacPhail (Baltimore Orioles) Theo Epstein (Boston Red Sox) Brian Cashman (New York Yankees) Andrew Friedman (Tampa Bay Rays) Alex Anthopoulos (Toronto Blue Jays) Central Division Kenny Williams (Chicago White Sox) Chris Antonetti (Cleveland Indians) Dave Dombrowski (Detroit Tigers) Dayton Moore (Kansas City Royals) Bill Smith (Minnesota Twins) West Division Tony Reagins (Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim) Billy Beane (Oakland Athletics) Jack Zduriencik (Seattle Mariners) Jon Daniels (Texas Rangers) National League East Division Frank Wren (Atlanta Braves) Michael Hill (Florida Marlins) Sandy Alderson (New York Mets) Rubén Amaro, Jr. (Philadelphia Phillies) Mike Rizzo (Washington Nationals) Central Division Jim Hendry (Chicago Cubs) Walt Jocketty (Cincinnati Reds) Ed Wade (Houston Astros) Doug Melvin (Milwaukee Brewers) Neal Huntington (Pittsburgh Pirates) John Mozeliak (St. Louis Cardinals) West Division Kevin Towers (Arizona Diamondbacks) Dan O'Dowd (Colorado Rockies) Ned Colletti (Los Angeles Dodgers) Jed Hoyer (San Diego Padres) Brian Sabean (San Francisco Giants) v · d · eChicago White Sox Formerly the Sioux City Cornhuskers, St. Paul Saints, and the White Stockings • Based in Chicago, Illinois The Franchise History • Seasons • No-hitters • Players • Owners and executives • Managers • Broadcasters • Opening Day starting pitchers • First-round draft picks Ballparks South Side Park • Comiskey Park • U.S. Cellular Field Spring Training: Recreation Park • Palm Springs Stadium • Plant Field • Al Lopez Field • Payne Park • Ed Smith Stadium • Tucson Electric Park • Camelback Ranch Culture Black Sox Scandal • Disco Demolition Night • White Flag Trade • Andy the Clown • "Let's Go, Go-Go White Sox" • "Sweet Home Chicago" • Curse of the Black Sox • Na Na Hey Hey Kiss Him Goodbye • Nancy Faust • Southpaw • Gene Honda • Sox–35th • Take Me Out to the Ball Game • 1994 Bat Burglary • Soxville • Turn Back the Clock • Mark Buehrle's perfect game Rivalries Chicago Cubs Retired Numbers 2 • 3 • 4 • 9 • 11 • 16 • 19 • 35 • 42 • 72 Key Personnel Owners: Jerry Reinsdorf and Eddie Einhorn • General Manager: Kenny Williams • Manager: Ozzie Guillén • Team Captain: Paul Konerko World Series Championships (3) 1906 • 1917 • 2005 American League Championships (6) 1901 • 1906 • 1917 • 1919 • 1959 • 2005 Division Championships (5) Western: 1983 • 1993, Central: 2000 • 2005 • 2008 Minor League Affiliates Charlotte Knights (AAA) • Birmingham Barons (AA) • Winston-Salem Dash (A) • Kannapolis Intimidators (A) • Bristol White Sox (Rookie) • Great Falls Voyagers (Rookie) Other Assets Comcast SportsNet Chicago  Seasons (110) 1900s 1900 • 1901 • 1902 • 1903 • 1904 • 1905 • 1906 • 1907 • 1908 • 1909 1910s 1910 • 1911 • 1912 • 1913 • 1914 • 1915 • 1916 • 1917 • 1918 • 1919 1920s 1920 • 1921 • 1922 • 1923 • 1924 • 1925 • 1926 • 1927 • 1928 • 1929 1930s 1930 • 1931 • 1932 • 1933 • 1934 • 1935 • 1936 • 1937 • 1938 • 1939 1940s 1940 • 1941 • 1942 • 1943 • 1944 • 1945 • 1946 • 1947 • 1948 • 1949 1950s 1950 • 1951 • 1952 • 1953 • 1954 • 1955 • 1956 • 1957 • 1958 • 1959 1960s 1960 • 1961 • 1962 • 1963 • 1964 • 1965 • 1966 • 1967 • 1968 • 1969 1970s 1970 • 1971 • 1972 • 1973 • 1974 • 1975 • 1976 • 1977 • 1978 • 1979 1980s 1980 • 1981 • 1982 • 1983 • 1984 • 1985 • 1986 • 1987 • 1988 • 1989 1990s 1990 • 1991 • 1992 • 1993 • 1994 • 1995 • 1996 • 1997 • 1998 • 1999 2000s 2000 • 2001 • 2002 • 2003 • 2004 • 2005 • 2006 • 2007 • 2008 • 2009 2010s 2010 • 2011 v · d · eChicago White Sox 2005 World Series Champions 1 Willie Harris | 5 Juan Uribe | 7 Timo Pérez | 8 Carl Everett | 12 A. J. Pierzynski | 14 Paul Konerko | 15 Tadahito Iguchi | 18 Cliff Politte | 20 Jon Garland | 22 Scott Podsednik | 23 Jermaine Dye (World Series MVP) | 24 Joe Crede | 26 Orlando Hernández | 27 Geoff Blum | 32 Dustin Hermanson | 33 Aaron Rowand | 34 Freddy García  | 36 Chris Widger | 38 Pablo Ozuna | 43 Dámaso Marté | 45 Bobby Jenks | 46 Neal Cotts | 51 Luis Vizcaíno | 52 José Contreras | 56 Mark Buehrle Manager 13 Ozzie Guillén Bench Coach 3 Harold Baines | First Base Coach 30 Tim Raines | Third Base Coach 28 Joey Cora | Pitching Coach 21 Don Cooper | Hitting Coach 29 Greg Walker | Bullpen Coach 53 Art Kusnyer | General Manager Kenny Williams Regular season • American League Division Series • American League Championship Series v · d · eChicago White Sox general managers Grabiner • O'Connor • Lane • Comiskey • Rigney • Veeck • Greenberg • Short • Holcomb • Hemond • Harrelson • Himes • Schueler • Williams Persondata Name Williams, Ken Alternative names Short description Date of birth April 6, 1964 Place of birth Berkeley, California Date of death Place of death