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Panama This article is part of the series: Politics and government of Panama Constitution President Ricardo Martinelli Vice President Juan Carlos Varela National Assembly Political parties Elections 1999 - 2004 2006 referendum - 2009 Provinces and Comarcas Districts Corregimientos Panama Canal Authority Foreign relations Other countries · Atlas Politics portal view • talk • edit The Republic of Panama held a general election on Sunday, 2 May 2004, electing both a new President of the Republic and a new Legislative Assembly. Contents 1 Presidential election results[1] 2 Legislative and local elections 3 References 4 External links // Presidential election results[1] Candidate Party/Alliance Votes % Martín Torrijos New Fatherland (PN) 711,164 47.44% Democratic Revolutionary Party (PRD) 649,157 43.29% People's Party (PP) 62,007 04.15% Guillermo Endara Solidarity Party (PS) 462,824 30.86% José Miguel Alemán Vision of the Country (VDP) 245,568 16.39% Arnulfista Party (PA) 162,830 10.88% National Liberal Republican Movement (MOLIRENA) 60,106 04.00% National Liberal Party (PLN) 22,632 01.51% Ricardo Martinelli Democratic Change Party (PCD) 79,491 05.31% Total valid votes 1,499,047 100% Spoilt and invalid votes 38,295 02.49% Total votes/Turnout 1,537,342 76.88% Registered voters 1,999,553 Population 2,940,000 With nearly all the votes counted, Martín Torrijos of the Democratic Revolutionary Party led with 47% of the vote, followed by former President Guillermo Endara of the Solidarity Party, with 30%. Endara formally conceded the election at around 21:00 local time. Torrijos replaces president Mireya Moscoso for a five-year term, from 1 September 2004. Along with Torrijos, voters also elected his two vice-presidents, who run on party tickets in conjunction with the presidential candidates. Torrijos is the son of Omar Torrijos, who served as Panama's de facto president from 1968 to 1978. Although Omar Torrijos was a radical nationalist, Martín Torrijos is described as a centrist who favors a market economy and a free-trade agreement with the United States. Legislative and local elections In addition to its president and vice presidents, Panama elected a new Legislative Assembly (78 members), 20 deputies to represent the country at the Central American Parliament, and a string of mayors and other municipal officers. Legislative election results[2] Parties and alliances Votes/districts % Seats New Fatherland (PN) 636,675 43.82% 42 Democratic Revolutionary Party (PRD) 549,948 37.85% 41 People's Party (PP) 86,727 05.97% 01 Vision of the Country (VDP) 481,298 33.12% 24 Arnulfista Party (PA) 279,560 19.24% 17 National Liberal Republican Movement (MOLIRENA) 125,547 08.64% 04 National Liberal Party (PLN) 76,191 05.24% 03 Solidarity Party (PS) 227,604 15.66% 09 Democratic Change Party (PCD) 107,511 07.40% 03 Total valid votes 1,453,088 100% 78 Spoilt and invalid votes 71,888 04.71% Total votes/Turnout 1,524,976 76.27% Registered voters 1,999,553 Population 2,940,000 The Panama City mayor race was won also by the PRD. Mayor Juan Carlos Navarro was re-elected. References ^ Elections in the Americas : a data handbook / ed. by Dieter Nohlen, Vol. 1. [Oxford] [u.a.]: Oxford Univ. Press, 2005. Pp.535. ^ Elections in the Americas : a data handbook / ed. by Dieter Nohlen, Vol. 1. [Oxford] [u.a.] : Oxford Univ. Press, 2005. Pp.528. External links Official Results (Panamanian Electoral Tribunal) Panama elects ex-dictator's son (BBC) First election since Canal handover (The Guardian) v • d • e Elections and referendums in Panama Presidential elections 1916 · 1918 · 1920 · 1924 · 1928 · 1932 · 1936 · 1940 · 1945 · 1948 · 1952 · 1956 · 1960 · 1964 · 1968 · 1972 · 1978 · 1984 · 1989 · 1994 · 1999 · 2004 · 2009 Parliamentary elections 1918 · 1924 · 1928 · 1932 · 1936 · 1940 · 1945 · 1948 · 1952 · 1956 · 1960 · 1964 · 1968 · 1972 · 1978 · 1980 · 1984 · 1989 · 1994 · 1999 · 2004 · 2009 Referendums 1998 · 2006