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61 Virginis 61 Vir as seen with a 12.5" telescope with a field of view of 45.1 arcminutes Observation data Epoch J2000      Equinox J2000 Constellation Virgo Right ascension 13h 18m 24.3s Declination −18° 18′ 40.3″ Apparent magnitude (V) 4.74 Characteristics Spectral type G5V Apparent magnitude (B) 5.45 Apparent magnitude (J) 3.334 Apparent magnitude (H) 2.974 Apparent magnitude (K) 2.956 U−B color index 0.26 B−V color index 0.71 V−R color index 0.37 R−I color index 0.33 Variable type None Astrometry Radial velocity (Rv) -8.2 km/s Proper motion (μ) RA: -1,069.90 mas/yr Dec.: -1,063.78 mas/yr Parallax (π) 117.35 ± 0.69 mas Distance 27.8 ± 0.2 ly (8.52 ± 0.05 pc) Absolute magnitude (MV) 5.07 Details Mass 0.95+0.04 −0.03 M☉ Radius 0.940+0.034 −0.029[1] R☉ Surface gravity (log g) 4.5[2] Luminosity 0.85[3] L☉ Temperature 5,585[2] K Metallicity [2] Rotation <17 km/s. Age 6.1–6.6[4] Gyr Other designations GJ 506, HR 5019, BD-17°3813, HD 115617, LHS 349, LTT 5111, GCTP 3039.00, SAO 157844, FK5 1345, GC 18007, BDS 6447, CCDM 13185-1818, LPM 467, LFT 990, HIP 64924. Database references SIMBAD data NStED data ARICNS data Extrasolar Planets Encyclopaedia data 61 Virginis is a G5V class star slightly less massive than the Sun (G2V), located about 27.8 light-years away in the constellation of Virgo. The composition of this star is nearly identical to the Sun and there is only a low level of activity in the stellar chromosphere.[2] 61 Virginis is a G5V class star slightly less massive than the Sun (G2V) This star is rotating once every 29 days at the equator. The space velocity components of this star are U = –37.9, V = –35.3 and W = –24.7 km/s. 61 Vir is orbiting through the Milky Way galaxy at a distance of 6.9 kpc from the core, with an eccentricity of 0.15. It is believed to be a disk star with an estimated age of more than six billion years.[3][4] 61 Virginis (G5V) is the first well established main sequence yellow dwarf star very similar to the Sun with a potential Super-Earth,[1] though COROT-7 (a borderline orange dwarf) is arguably the first. Contents 1 Planetary system 2 See also 3 References 4 External links Planetary system The orbits of the planets of 61 Virginis and the debris disk. There was some evidence that it may have a jovian planet, but it seemed not to have a nearby massive companion.[5] A subsequent study also failed to find the large substellar companion (with 20 to 80 times the mass of Jupiter) or a Jupiter-class planet,[6] so it was a good candidate for possessing a family of terrestrial planets, with an orbit slightly smaller and a year slightly less than that of the Earth. A survey of this star with the Spitzer Space Telescope revealed an excess of infrared radiation at a wavelength of 160 μm. This indicated the presence of a debris disk in orbit around the star. This disk was resolved at 70 μm, corresponding to an inner radius of 96 AU from the star. The outer radius is estimated as 195 AU and the total mass of the disk is 5 × 10−5 the mass of the Earth.[7] On 14 December 2009, scientists announced the discovery of three planets with masses between 5 and 25 times that of Earth orbiting around 61 Virginis.[1][8] The three planets all orbit very near the star; when compared to the orbits of the planets in our solar system, all three would orbit inside the orbit of Venus. Additional data is needed to confirm the possibility of a fourth planet.[1] The 61 Virginis system[1] Companion (in order from star) Mass Semimajor axis (AU) Orbital period (days) Eccentricity b ≥ 5.1±0.5 M⊕ 0.050201±0.000005 4.2150±0.0006 0.12±0.11 c ≥ 18.2±1.1 M⊕ 0.2175±0.0001 38.021±0.034 0.14±0.06 d ≥ 22.9±2.6 M⊕ 0.476±0.001 123.01±0.55 0.35±0.09 See also GJ 1214 HD 1461 List of extrasolar planets List of stars in Virgo References ^ a b c d e Vogt, Steven; Wittenmyer; Paul Butler; Simon O'Toole; Henry; Rivera; Stefano Meschiari; Gregory Laughlin et al. (2009). "A Super-Earth and two Neptunes Orbiting the Nearby Sun-like star 61 Virginis". arXiv:0912.2599v1 [astro-ph.EP].  ^ a b c d Perrin, M.-N.; Cayrel de Strobel, G.; Dennefeld, M. (February 1988). "High S/N detailed spectral analysis of four G and K dwarfs within 10 PC of the sun". Astronomy and Astrophysics 191 (2): 237–247. Bibcode 1988A&A...191..237P.  ^ a b Porto de Mello, Gustavo; del Peloso, Eduardo F.; Ghezzi, Luan (April 2006). "Astrobiologically Interesting Stars Within 10 Parsecs of the Sun". Astrobiology 6 (2): 308–331. arXiv:astro-ph/0511180. Bibcode 2006AsBio...6..308P. doi:10.1089/ast.2006.6.308. PMID 16689649.  ^ a b Mamajek, Eric E.; Hillenbrand, Lynne A. (November 2008). "Improved Age Estimation for Solar-Type Dwarfs Using Activity-Rotation Diagnostics". The Astrophysical Journal 687 (2): 1264–1293. Bibcode 2008ApJ...687.1264M. doi:10.1086/591785.  ^ Campbell et al., 1988, pages 904, 906, and 919 ^ Cumming et al., 1999 ^ Tanner, Angelle; et al. (October 2009). "Survey of Nearby FGK Stars at 160 μm with Spitzer". The Astrophysical Journal 704 (1): 109–116. Bibcode 2009ApJ...704..109T. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/704/1/109.  ^ Tim Stephens (2009-12-14). "New planet discoveries suggest low-mass planets are common around nearby stars". UCSC News. UC Santa Cruz. http://www.ucsc.edu/news_events/text.asp?pid=3439. Retrieved 2009-12-14.  External links 61 Virginis at SolStation Systemic Blog article with comparative map of orbits of 61 Vir b,c and d Aladin image of 61 Virginis v · d · e61 Virginis system Stars 61 Virginis Planets 61 Virginis b • 61 Virginis c • 61 Virginis d v · d · e← Star systems within 25–30 light-years → Star systems (including brown dwarf systems) within 25–30 light-years from Earth. A V (White) Fomalhaut (25.1 ± 0.2 ly; 1 star, 1 planet: planet b)‡ • Vega (25.30 ± 0.11 ly; 1 star) F V (Yellow-white) Pi³ Orionis «Tabit» (26.2 ± 0.2 ly; 1 star) • Chi Draconis (26.22 ± 0.11 ly; 2 stars) • Zeta Tucanae (28.0 ± 0.2 ly; 1 star) • Gamma Leporis (29.3 ± 0.2 ly; 2 stars) • Gamma Pavonis (30.1 ± 0.2 ly; 1 star)‡ G (Yellow) IV Mu Herculis (27.4 ± 0.2 ly; 3 stars) V Xi Ursae Majoris «Alula Australis» (27.25 ± 0.18 ly; 3 stars, 1 brown dwarf) • Beta Canum Venaticorum «Chara» (27.3 ± 0.2 ly; 1 star) • 61 Virginis (27.8 ± 0.2 ly; 1 star, 3 planets: planet b • planet c • planet d) • Chi¹ Orionis (28.3 ± 0.3 ly; 2 stars) • 41 G. Arae (28.7 ± 0.3 ly; 2 stars) • Beta Comae Berenices (29.9 ± 0.2 ly; 1 star)‡ • Kappa¹ Ceti (29.9 ± 0.2 ly; 1 star)‡ • HR 4523 (30.1 ± 0.2 ly; 2 stars, 1 planet: planet b)‡ VI Groombridge 1830 (29.9 ± 0.2 ly; 1 star)‡ K (Orange) IV Delta Eridani «Rana» (29.5 ± 0.3 ly; 1 star) V TW Piscis Austrini (24.9 ± 0.2 ly; 1 star)‡ • Gliese 673 (25.2 ± 0.2 ly; 1 star)‡ • Gliese 884 (26.6 ± 0.3 ly; 1 star) • p Eridani (26.6 ± 0.3 ly; 2 stars) • Gliese 250 (28.4 ± 0.3 ly; 2 stars) • HR 1614 (28.8 ± 0.3 ly; 1 star) • HR 7722 (28.8 ± 0.3 ly; 1 star, 1 planet: planet b) M V (Red dwarf) Gliese 623 (26.2 ± 0.3 ly; 2 stars) • Gliese 185 (27.8 ± 0.4 ly; 2 stars) • Gliese 745 (28.1 ± 0.6 ly; 2 stars) • Gliese 849 (28.6 ± 0.5 ly; 1 star, 1 planet: planet b) • Gliese 433 (29.5 ± 0.5 ly; 1 star, 1 planet: planet b) • Gliese 317 (29.9 ± 5.5 ly; 1 star: Gliese 317; 1 (2?) planets: planet b • planet c?)‡ Brown Dwarf L 2MASS 0036+1821 (28.6 ± 0.2 ly; 1 brown dwarf) T WISEPC J045853.90+643451.9 (24 ± 6 ly; 1 brown dwarf)‡ • 2MASS 0727+1710 (29.6 ± 0.6 ly; 1 brown dwarf)‡ In left column are stellar classes of primary members of star systems. ‡Distance error margin extends out of declared distance interval. Bold are systems containing at least one component with absolute magnitude of +8.5 or brighter. Italic are systems possibly located within declared distance interval, but probably not. v · d · e«Bright» star systems within 30 light-years Star systems within 30 light-years from Earth with brightest member's absolute magnitude of +8.5 or brighter. v · d · e0–10 ly A V (White) Sirius (8.58 ± 0.03 ly; 2 stars) G V (Yellow) Solar System (0 ly; 1 star, 8 planets) • Alpha Centauri (4.365 ± 0.007 ly; 3 stars: Alpha¹ Centauri • Alpha² Centauri • Proxima Centauri (4.242 ± 0.002 ly)) v · d · e10–20 ly A V (White) Altair (16.69 ± 0.04 ly; 1 star) F V (Yellow-white) Procyon (11.44 ± 0.02 ly; 2 stars) G V (Yellow) Tau Ceti (11.905 ± 0.007 ly; 1 star) • Sigma Draconis «Alsafi» (18.77 ± 0.02 ly; 1 star) • Eta Cassiopeiae «Achird» (19.39 ± 0.05 ly; 2 stars) • e (82 G.) Eridani (19.71 ± 0.02 ly; 1 star) • Delta Pavonis (19.92 ± 0.02 ly; 1 star) K V (Orange) Epsilon Eridani (10.480 ± 0.003 ly; 1 star, 2 planets: planet b • planet c) • 61 Cygni (11.40 ± 0.02 ly; 2 stars) • Epsilon Indi (11.81 ± 0.01 ly; 1 star, 2 brown dwarfs) • Groombridge 1618 (15.87 ± 0.04 ly; 1 star) • Omicron² (40) Eridani «Keid» (16.25 ± 0.02 ly; 3 stars) • 70 Ophiuchi (16.64 ± 0.07 ly; 2 stars) • 33 G. Librae (19.12 ± 0.08 ly; 3 stars, 1 brown dwarf) • 36 Ophiuchi (19.40 ± 0.05 ly; 3 stars) • Gliese 783 (19.62 ± 0.04 ly; 2 stars) v · d · e20–30 ly A V (White) Fomalhaut (25.1 ± 0.2 ly; 1 star, 1 planet: planet b) • Vega (25.30 ± 0.11 ly; 1 star) F V (Yellow-white) Pi³ Orionis «Tabit» (26.2 ± 0.2 ly; 1 star) • Chi Draconis (26.22 ± 0.11 ly; 2 stars) • Zeta Tucanae (28.0 ± 0.2 ly; 1 star) • Gamma Leporis (29.3 ± 0.2 ly; 2 stars) • Gamma Pavonis (30.1 ± 0.2 ly; 1 star)‡ G (Yellow) IV Beta Hydri (24.4 ± 0.1 ly; 1 star) • Mu Herculis (27.4 ± 0.2 ly; 3 stars) V Xi Boötis (22.1 ± 0.2 ly; 2 stars) • Xi Ursae Majoris «Alula Australis» (27.25 ± 0.18 ly; 3 stars, 1 brown dwarf) • Beta Canum Venaticorum «Chara» (27.3 ± 0.2 ly; 1 star) • 61 Virginis (27.8 ± 0.2 ly; 1 star, 3 planets: planet b • planet c • planet d) • Chi¹ Orionis (28.3 ± 0.3 ly; 2 stars) • 41 G. Arae (28.7 ± 0.3 ly; 2 stars) • Beta Comae Berenices (29.9 ± 0.2 ly; 1 star)‡ • Kappa¹ Ceti (29.9 ± 0.2 ly; 1 star)‡ • HR 4523 (30.1 ± 0.2 ly; 2 stars, 1 planet: planet b)‡ VI Mu Cassiopeiae «Marfak-West» (24.6 ± 0.2 ly; 2 stars) • Groombridge 1830 (29.9 ± 0.2 ly; 1 star)‡ K (Orange) IV Delta Eridani «Rana» (29.5 ± 0.3 ly; 1 star) V Gliese 892 (21.34 ± 0.04 ly; 1 star) • HR 753 (23.5 ± 0.2 ly; 3 stars) • Gliese 667 (23.6 ± 0.1 ly; 3 stars, 1 planet: planet Cb) • Gliese 33 (24.3 ± 0.2 ly; 1 star) • 107 Piscium (24.4 ± 0.2 ly; 1 star) • TW Piscis Austrini (24.9 ± 0.2 ly; 1 star) • Gliese 673 (25.2 ± 0.2 ly; 1 star) • Gliese 884 (26.6 ± 0.3 ly; 1 star) • p Eridani (26.6 ± 0.3 ly; 2 stars) • Gliese 250 (28.4 ± 0.3 ly; 2 stars) • HR 1614 (28.8 ± 0.3 ly; 1 star) • HR 7722 (28.8 ± 0.3 ly; 1 star, 1 planet: planet b) In left column are stellar classes of primary members of star systems. ‡Distance error margin extends out of declared distance interval. Italic are systems possibly located within declared distance interval, but likely not. Total about 50 (47–52) systems. v · d · eVirgo constellation Stars v · d · eStars of Virgo Bayer α (Spica) • β (Zavijava) • γ (Porrima) • δ (Auva) • ε (Vindemiatrix) • ζ (Heze) • η (Zaniah) • θ • ι (Syrma) • κ • λ (Khambalia) • μ (Rijl al Awwa) • ν • ξ • ο • π • ρ • σ • τ • υ • φ • χ • ψ • ω • b • c • d¹ • d² • e • f • g • h • i • k • l • m • o • p • q • y • A¹ • A² • M Flamsteed 1 (ω) • 2 (ξ) • 3 (ν) • 4 (A¹) • 5 (β, Zavijava) • 6 (A²) • 7 (b) • 8 (π) • 9 (ο) • 10 • 11 • 12 • 13 • 15 (η, Zaniah) • 16 (c) • 17 • 20 • 21 (q) • 25 (f) • 26 (χ) • 27 • 28 • 29 (γ, Porrima) • 30 (ρ) • 31 (d¹) • 32 (d²) • 33 • 34 • 35 • 37 • 38 • 40 (ψ) • 41 • 43 (δ, Auva) • 44 • 46 • 47 (ε, Vindemiatrix) • 48 • 49 • 50 • 51 (θ) • 53 • 54 • 55 • 56 • 57 • 59 (e) • 60 (σ) • 61 • 62 • 63 • 64 • 65 • 66 • 67 (α, Spica) • 68 (i) • 69 • 70 • 71 • 72 • 73 • 74 (l, "el") • 75 • 76 (h) • 77 • 78 (o, small Latin "o") • 79 (ζ, Heze) • 80 • 82 (m) • 83 • 84 • 85 • 86 • 87 • 89 • 90 (p) • 92 • 93 (τ) • 94 • 95 • 96 • 98 (κ) • 99 (ι, Syrma) • 100 (λ, Khambalia) • 102 (υ) • 104 • 105 (φ) • 106 • 107 (μ, Rijl al Awwa) • 108 • 109 • 110 • 1 Ser (M) • 2 Ser Nearby Ross 128 • Wolf 424 • FL (Wolf 424 B) • GL • Gliese 514 • Gliese 493.1 • Gliese 518 • Gliese 486 • GJ 1154 • 61 • GJ 3820 List Galaxy cluster Messier 49 · 58 · 59 · 60 · 61 · 84 · 86 · 87 · 89 · 90 Coordinates: 13h 18m 24.3s, −18° 18′ 40.3″ This main sequence star-related article is a stub. 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