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Sabir Mahfouz Lahmar Sabir Mahfouz Lahmar from his OARDEC dossier Born May 22, 1969 (1969-05-22) (age 41) Constantine, Algeria Detained at Guantanamo ISN 10002 Charge(s) No charge (held in extrajudicial detention) Status Released to France Occupation Clergyman Sabir Mahfouz Lahmar is an Bosnian citizen, formerly held in extrajudicial detention in the United States Guantanamo Bay detainment camps, in Cuba.[1] His Guantanamo Internment Serial Number was 10002. The Department of Defense reports that he was born on May 22, 1969, in Constantin, Algeria. Sabir Mahfouz Lahmar was captured in Bosnia and Herzegovina in October 2001 and was transferred to France on November 30, 2009.[2] Contents 1 Combatant Status Review 2 Administrative Review Board 3 Habeas Corpus and release 4 See also 5 References 6 External links // Combatant Status Review Main article: Combatant Status Review Tribunal Lahmar was among the 60% of prisoners who chose to participate in tribunal hearings.[3] A Summary of Evidence memo was prepared for the tribunal of each detainee. Lahmar's memo accused him of the following:[4]:[4][5] a. The detainee is associated with al Qaida: The detainee is associated with a known al Qaida facilitator. Bensayah Belkecem, alias Mejd is the apparent leader of the Bosnian Algerian cell and has a direct link to Usama Bin Laden. Bensayah Belkecem made phone calls to Abu Zubaydah, a senior aide to Usama Bin Laden, who was in charge of screening recruits for al Qaida training camps in Afghanistan. The detainee and Bensayah Belkecem were arrested on suspicion of being linked with international terrorism. The detainee had charges filed against him by the Bosnia-Herzegovina govt for International Terrorism. The detainee was arrested in October 01 under suspicion of planning to attack the American Embassy in Sarajevo, Bosnia-Herzegovina. The detainee advocated attacking U.S. forces and supported the Fatwa issued by Usama Bin Laden. The detainee is a member of the Algerian Armed Islamic Group and attempted to assume leadership in the organization in November 2000. The Algerian Armed Islamic Group is listed as a terrorist organization in the United States Department of Homeland Security Terrorist Organization Reference Guide. The detainee applied for a visa in Sarajevo for travel to Afghanistan on 27 September 2001. The detainee was jailed in late 1997, for robbing a U.S. Citizen. Administrative Review Board Detainees whose Combatant Status Review Tribunals labeled them "enemy combatants" were scheduled for annual Administrative Review Board hearings. These hearings were designed to assess the threat a detainee may pose if released or transferred, and whether there are other factors that warrant his continued detention.[6] Lahmar chose to participate in his Administrative Review Board hearing.[7] Habeas Corpus and release US District Court Judge Richard Leon ruled, in September 2008, on Saber's habeas corpus petition.[8] He concluded that there was no evidence to support classifying him as an "enemy combatant", and that he should be released. He made the same ruling for four other Bosnians of Algerian descent. Lahmar was transferred to French territory for release on November 30, 2009.[9] Noting that Lahmar would "finally begin to live a normal life again", the French foreign ministry pledged to help re-integrate him into society.[9] In its coverage of his release the Washington Post noted that Leon's September 2008 ruling had ordered his release "forthwith".[10] Three other men were transferred when Lahmar was released.[11] A Palestinian captive was transferred to Hungary. His name was not released, and authorities did not report whether he was being detained in Hungarian custody or set free. Two Tunisian captives, Adel Ben Mabrouk, and Mohamed Ben Riadh Nasri, were transferred to the custody of Italy.[12] See also Boumediene v. Bush References ^ OARDEC (2006-05-15). "List of Individuals Detained by the Department of Defense at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba from January 2002 through May 15, 2006". United States Department of Defense. http://www.dod.mil/news/May2006/d20060515%20List.pdf. Retrieved 2007-09-29.  ^ The New York Times. http://projects.nytimes.com/guantanamo/detainees/10002-sabir-mahfouz-lahmar.  ^ OARDEC, Index to Transcripts of Detainee Testimony and Documents Submitted by Detainees at Combatant Status Review Tribunals Held at Guantanamo Between July 2004 and March 2005, September 4, 2007 ^ a b Summarized transcripts (.pdf), from Sabir Mahfouz Lahmar's Combatant Status Review Tribunal - pages 16-24 ^ Office for the Administrative Review of Detained Enemy Combatants (September 23, 2004). "Summary of Evidence for Combatant Status Review Tribunal Lahmar, Sabir Mahfouz". Department of Defense. pp. pages 75–76. http://www.dod.mil/pubs/foi/detainees/csrt_arb/ARB_Transcript_Set_13_22245-22523.pdf#75. Retrieved 2007-08-19.  ^ "Annual Administrative Review Boards for Enemy Combatants Held at Guantanamo Attributable to Senior Defense Officials". March 6, 2007. http://www.defense.gov/transcripts/transcript.aspx?transcriptid=3902. Retrieved November 12, 2010.  ^ Summarized transcript (.pdf), from Sabir Mahfouz Lahmar's Administrative Review Board hearing - page 115 ^ Richard Bernstein (2009-09-23). "A Detainee Freed, but Not Released". New York Times. Archived from the original on 2009-09-23. http://www.webcitation.org/query?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.nytimes.com%2F2009%2F09%2F24%2Fus%2F24iht-letter.html&date=2009-09-23.  ^ a b "Algerian transferred from Guantanamo to France: lawyer". Agence France-Presse. 2009-11-30. Archived from the original on 2009-12-02. http://www.webcitation.org/query?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.google.com%2Fhostednews%2Fafp%2Farticle%2FALeqM5gmG5QgvT7-GmkSoLztKVMcH-27RA&date=2009-12-02.  ^ Peter Finn, Julie Tate (2009-12-01). "4 from Guantanamo are sent to Europe". Washington Post. Archived from the original on 2009-12-02. http://www.webcitation.org/query?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.washingtonpost.com%2Fwp-dyn%2Fcontent%2Farticle%2F2009%2F11%2F30%2FAR2009113002950.html&date=2009-12-02.  ^ Peter Finn, Julie Tate (2009-12-01). "4 from Guantanamo are sent to Europe". Washington Post. Archived from the original on 2009-12-02. http://www.webcitation.org/query?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.washingtonpost.com%2Fwp-dyn%2Fcontent%2Farticle%2F2009%2F11%2F30%2FAR2009113002950.html&date=2009-12-02. Retrieved 2009-12-02.  ^ "Italy: 2 Guantánamo Detainees Arrive for Trial on Terror Charges". New York Times. 2009-11-30. http://www.nytimes.com/2009/12/01/world/europe/01briefs-Italybrf.html. Retrieved 2009-12-02.  External links Hate Club: Al-Qaeda's Web of Terror, Time (magazine), November 4, 2001—Lahmar's Combatant Status Review Tribunal contained a copy of this article, marked as exhibit R6. documents from Sabir Mahfouz Lahmar's Combatant Status Review Tribunal Human Rights First; Habeas Works: Federal Courts’ Proven Capacity to Handle Guantánamo Cases (2010) v • d • e Militants in the War on Terror who have lived in Algeria Salafist Group for Preaching and Combat Nabil Sahraouiǂ · Samir Moussaabǂ · Abu Doha Held at the Guantanamo Bay detainment camps Mustafa Ahmed Hamlily · The Algerian Six: · Bensayah Belkacem · Hadj Boudella · Lakhdar Boumediene · Sabir Mahfouz Lahmar · Mustafa Ait Idr · Mohammed Nechle Alleged members of al-Qaeda and al-Jihad Abu Sulayman Jazairiǂ · Ahmed Brahim† Armed Islamic Group Abdelhak Layada° · Djamel Zitouni · Khaled Kelkalǂ Other Laid Saidi · Abdelmajid Dahoumane · Djamel Beghal · Ahmed Ressam v • d • e Controversies surrounding persons captured during the War on Terror Guantanamo Bay detention camp Suicide attempts · Qur'an desecration controversy · Boycott of military tribunals · Former captives alleged to have (re)joined insurgency · Hunger strikes · Force feeding · Homicide accusations CIA black site operations Enhanced interrogation techniques · Ghost detainees · Waterboarding · Destruction of interrogation tapes Prison and detainee abuse Abu Ghraib · Bagram · Canadian Afghan detainee issue · Black jail Prison uprisings and escapes Battle of Qala-i-Jangi · Battle of Abu Ghraib · Sarposa Prison mass escape · Basra prison incident · Afghan escapes · Iraqi escapes Deaths in custody Dilawar · Jamal Nasser · Abdul Wahid · Habibullah · Abed Hamed Mowhoush · Manadel al-Jamadi · Nagem Hatab · Baha Mousa · Fashad Mohamed · Muhammad Zaidan · Gul Rahman · Abdul Wali Tortured Abu Zubaydah · Satar Jabar · Mohamedou Ould Slahi · Mohammed al Qahtani · Khalid Sheikh Mohammed · Abdul Jabar · Abd al-Rahim al-Nashiri · Binyam Mohamed Forced disappearances who were never found Ibn al-Shaykh al-Libi · Abdul Aziz · Abdul Rahim al-Sharqawi · Muhammed al-Darbi · Mohammed Omar Abdel-Rahman · Yassir al-Jazeeri · Adil al-Jazeeri · Tariq Mahmood · Hassan Ghul · Musaad Aruchi · Hiwa Abdul Rahman Rashul · Abdul Quddoos Khan Reports and legislation Ryder Report · Fay Report · Taguba Report · Church Report · Detainee Treatment Act Related media The Road to Guantanamo · Taxi to the Dark Side · Standard Operating Procedure · Torturing Democracy Persondata Name Lahmar, Sabir Mahfouz Alternative names Short description Date of birth May 22, 1969 Place of birth Constantine, Algeria Date of death Place of death