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This is a list of accidents and incidents involving the Douglas DC-3A that have taken place in 1974, including aircraft based on the DC-3 airframe such as the Douglas C-47 Skytrain and Lisunov Li-2. Military accidents are included; and hijackings and incidents of terrorism are covered, although acts of war are outside the scope of this list. Contents 1 January 2 February 3 April 4 May 5 July 6 August 7 September 8 October 9 November 10 December 11 See also 12 References 13 Notes // January A C-47A of the Força Aérea Portuguesa On 8 January, Douglas VC-47B 6161 of the Força Aérea Portuguesa crashed at Vila Cabral Airport and was damaged beyond economic repair. The aircraft was on a military flight from Mueda Airport and it is reported that it was hit by small arms fire on approach to Vila Cabral.[1] On 17 January, Douglas DC-3A HK-1216 of Cessnyca crashed near Chigorodo killing all 14 people on board. The aircraft was on a scheduled passenger flight which had originated at Gonzalo Mejía Airport.[2] On 19 January, Douglas DC-3 TAM-30 of TAM was damaged beyond economic repair in a wheels-up landing at Laia.[3] On 21 January, Douglas C-47A PK-GDC of the Burmah Oil Co was damaged beyond economic repair in an accident at Broome Airport.[4] On 23 January, Douglas C-47A 5V-MAG of the Force Aérienne Togolaise was damaged beyond economic repair in an accident at Lama Kara.[5] On 28 January, Douglas C-47B CF-TVK of Bradley Air Services was destroyed in a hangar fire at Carp Airport, Ottawa.[6] During January, Douglas C-47A FAC-960 of the Fuerza Aérea de Chile was damaged beyond economic repair in a forced landing on Highway 7 in southern Chile.[7] February On 15 February, a Douglas DC-3 of APSA was damaged beyond economic repair when it crash-landed at Managua Airport.[8] On 23 February, Douglas TC-47B HK-1333 of Taxi Aéreo el Llanero was damaged beyond economic repair in a forced landing near Cali. The aircraft had departed from Alfonso Bonilla Aragón International Airport. An engine failure and in-flight fire meant a forced landing in a field.[9] April A RAAF Dakota On 10 April, Douglas C-47B A65-111 of the Royal Australian Air Force was destroyed by fire on the ground at RAAF Base Laverton, where it had been in storage since October 1972 pending its disposal. The cockpit was salvaged and in 1976 was sold to a private individual who restored it over a period of 13 years. The cockpit is now permanently mounted on a trailer and is displayed at air shows in Australia by its owner.[10][11] On 20 April, Douglas DC-3 XW-TFL of Air Union departed the runway on landing at Svay Rieng Airport and collided with some buildings. Six people were killed.[12] On 26 April, Douglas C-47 HJ254 of the Indian Air Force was reported to have been damaged beyond economic repair.[13] May On 2 May, Douglas C-47 HC-AUC of ATESA crashed into a mountain near Baños de Agua Santa killing 20 of the 25 people on board. The aircraft had departed from Pastaza Airport.[14] On 28 May, Douglas DC-3 XW-TFN of Air Union crashed at Kampong Chan Airport.[15] July On 3 July, Douglas DC-3 XW-PKT of Lane Xang Airlines was reported to have been written off at Kompong Som.[16] August On 5 August, Douglas C-47A C-FTAT of Laurentian Air Services flew into Mount Apica, Bagotville, Quebec killing five of the eleven people on board. The aircraft was on a domestic non-scheduled passenger flight from La Tuque Airport to Saint Honoré Airport.[17] On 5 August, Douglas C-47B ET-ABE of Ethiopian Airlines was damaged beyond economic repair when it overshot the runway on landing at Mota Airport.[18] On 12 August, Douglas C-47 HK-508 of Avianca flew into Trujillo Mountain killing all 27 people on board. The aircraft was on a domestic scheduled passenger flight from El Dorado Airport, Bogotá to La Florida Airport, Tumaco.[19] September On 12 September, Douglas C-47A BJ920 of the Indian Air Force was reported to have been damaged beyond economic repair.[20] October A Douglas TP-79 of the Svenska Flygvapnet A Douglas C-47 of Projeto Rondon On 5 October, a Douglas DC-3 was reported to have crashed in Guatemala killing all six people on board. The aircraft was operating a cargo flight carrying supplies for the relief of flood victims.[21] On 8 October, Douglas DC-3 XW-PKX of Khmer Airlines was damaged beyond economic repair in a take-off accident at Krakor Airport. The cause of the accident was that the pilot did not set the flaps to the take-off position.[22] On 9 October, Douglas TP-79 79005 of the Svenska Flygvapnet crashed on approach to Nyköping Airport. All 27 people on board survived.[23] On 18 October, Douglas C-47A PP-FOR of Projeto Rondon crashed at Bias Fortes killing nine people.[24] On 19 October, Douglas C-47B RP-C643 of Mabuhay Airlines was ditched off Calapan following failure of the port engine. One of the eight people on board was killed. The aircraft was operating a domestic non-scheduled passenger flight which had originated at Roxas City Airport.[25] November On 6 November, Douglas C-47 N76 of the Federal Aviation Administration was destroyed in a hangar fire at Anchorage International Airport, Alaska.[26] On 11 November, Douglas DC-3 TAM-34 of TAM - Transporte Aéreo Militar crashed near the Sorato Mountain.[27] On 13 November, Douglas C-47 FAB2050 of the Força Aérea Brasileira was reported to have been written off at Tomé-Açu.[28] On 15 November, Douglas C-47A RP-C570 of OASIS was damaged beyond economic repair when a forced landing was made in a paddy field shortly after take-off from Manila International Airport following failure of the starboard engine. One of the eight people on board was killed.[29] On 20 November, Douglas C-47A ET-AAR of Ethiopian Airlines crashed on take-off from Soddu Airport. Two of the 24 people on board were killed. The aircraft was operating a domestic scheduled passenger flight to Beica Airport.[30] December On 15 December, Douglas C-50 XW-TFI of Khemara Air crashed at Takéo.[31] On 25 December, Douglas C-47B A65-104 of the Royal Australian Air Force was damaged at RAAF Base Darwin during Cyclone Tracy and subsequently written off.[10] At Darwin Airport (which shares its runway with the RAAF base), Douglas C-47B PK-RDB of Seulawah Air Services was also damaged beyond repair.[32] The wings and tail of A65-104; and the rear fuselage and tail of PK-RDB; are now held in storage at the Australian Aviation Heritage Centre in Darwin.[33] See also List of accidents and incidents involving the DC-3 in the 1970s References ^ "6161 Accident description". Aviation Safety Network. http://aviation-safety.net/database/record.php?id=19740108-0. Retrieved 23 August 2010.  ^ "HK-1216 Accident description". Aviation Safety Network. http://aviation-safety.net/database/record.php?id=19740117-2. Retrieved 23 August 2010.  ^ "TAM-30 Accident description". Aviation Safety Network. http://aviation-safety.net/database/record.php?id=19740119-0. Retrieved 23 August 2010.  ^ "PK-GDC Accident description". Aviation Safety Network. http://aviation-safety.net/database/record.php?id=19740121-0. Retrieved 23 August 2010.  ^ "5V-MAG Accident description". Aviation Safety Network. http://aviation-safety.net/database/record.php?id=19740124-0. Retrieved 23 August 2010.  ^ "CF-TVK Accident description". Aviation Safety Network. http://aviation-safety.net/database/record.php?id=19740128-1. Retrieved 23 August 2010.  ^ "FAC-960 Accident description". Aviation Safety Network. http://aviation-safety.net/database/record.php?id=19740199-9. Retrieved 23 August 2010.  ^ "Accident description". Aviation Safety Network. http://aviation-safety.net/database/record.php?id=19740215-0. Retrieved 23 August 2010.  ^ "HK-1333 Accident description". Aviation Safety Network. http://aviation-safety.net/database/record.php?id=19740223-1. Retrieved 23 August 2010.  ^ a b "ADF Aircraft Serial Numbers RAAF/RAN A30/A65/N2; Douglas C-47, C-49, C-50, C-53, DC-2 and DC-3". ADF Serials. http://www.adf-serials.com/2a65.shtml. Retrieved 1 August 2010.  ^ Wilson, Stewart (1990). Dakota, Hercules and Caribou in Australian Service. Weston Creek, ACT: Aerospace Publications. p. 62. ISBN 0 9587978 5 4.  ^ "XW-TFL Accident description". Aviation Safety Network. http://aviation-safety.net/database/record.php?id=19740420-1. Retrieved 23 August 2010.  ^ "HJ254 Hull-loss description". Aviation Safety Network. http://aviation-safety.net/database/record.php?id=19740426-0. Retrieved 23 August 2010.  ^ "HC-AUC Accident description". Aviation Safety Network. http://aviation-safety.net/database/record.php?id=19740502-0. Retrieved 23 August 2010.  ^ "XW-TFN Accident description". Aviation Safety Network. http://aviation-safety.net/database/record.php?id=19740528-0. Retrieved 23 August 2010.  ^ "XW-PKT Hull-loss description". Aviation Safety Network. http://aviation-safety.net/database/record.php?id=19740703-0. Retrieved 23 August 2010.  ^ "C-FTAT Accident description". Aviation Safety Network. http://aviation-safety.net/database/record.php?id=19740805-0. Retrieved 24 August 2010.  ^ "ET-ABE Accident description". Aviation Safety Network. http://aviation-safety.net/database/record.php?id=19740805-2. Retrieved 24 August 2010.  ^ "HK-508 Accident description". Aviation Safety Network. http://aviation-safety.net/database/record.php?id=19740812-0. Retrieved 24 August 2010.  ^ "BJ920 Hull-loss description". Aviation Safety Network. http://aviation-safety.net/database/record.php?id=19740907-1. Retrieved 24 August 2010.  ^ "Accident description". Aviation Safety Network. http://aviation-safety.net/database/record.php?id=19741005-0. Retrieved 24 August 2010.  ^ "XW-PKX Accident description". Aviation Safety Network. http://aviation-safety.net/database/record.php?id=19741008-0. Retrieved 24 August 2010.  ^ "79005 Accident description". Aviation Safety Network. http://aviation-safety.net/database/record.php?id=19741009-0. Retrieved 24 August 2010.  ^ "Accident description". Aviation Safety Network. http://aviation-safety.net/database/record.php?id=19741018-1. Retrieved 24 August 2010.  ^ "RP-C643 Accident description". Aviation Safety Network. http://aviation-safety.net/database/record.php?id=19741019-0. Retrieved 24 August 2010.  ^ "N76 Hull-loss description". Aviation Safety Network. http://aviation-safety.net/database/record.php?id=19741106-2. Retrieved 24 August 2010.  ^ "TAM-34 Accident description". Aviation Safety Network. http://aviation-safety.net/database/record.php?id=19741111-0. Retrieved 24 August 2010.  ^ "FAB2050 Accident description". Aviation Safety Network. http://aviation-safety.net/database/record.php?id=19741113-0. Retrieved 24 August 2010.  ^ "Accident description". Aviation Safety Network. http://aviation-safety.net/database/record.php?id=19741115-0. Retrieved 24 August 2010.  ^ "ET-AAR Accident description". Aviation Safety Network. http://aviation-safety.net/database/record.php?id=19741120-1. Retrieved 24 August 2010.  ^ "XW-TFI accident description". Aviation Safety Network. http://aviation-safety.net/database/record.php?id=19741215-0. Retrieved 4 August 2010.  ^ "PK-RDB hull-loss description". Aviation Safety Network. http://aviation-safety.net/database/record.php?id=19741225-1. Retrieved 4 August 2010.  ^ "Census of surviving DC-3s in Australia". Adastron. http://www.adastron.com/dc-3/ozcensus.htm. Retrieved 1 August 2010.  Notes ^Note A Military versions of the DC-3 were known as C-47 Skytrain, C-48, C-49, C-50, C-51, C-52, C-53 Skytrooper, C-68, C-84, C-117 Super Dakota and YC-129 by the United States Army Air Force and as the R4D by the United States Navy. In Royal Air Force (and other British Commonwealth air forces') service, these aircraft were known as Dakotas.