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This article is an orphan, as few or no other articles link to it. Please introduce links to this page from related articles; suggestions may be available. (February 2009) Friedrich Huldreich Erismann (14 November 1842 - 13 November 1915) was a Swiss ophthalmologist and hygienist who was born in Gontenschwil. In 1867 he earned his medical doctorate at the University of Zurich, and subsequently furthered his studies in ophthalmology in Heidelberg, Vienna and Berlin. In 1869 he became an ophthalmologist in St. Petersburg, and several years later participated in the Russo-Turkish War. In 1867 he married Nadezhda Suslova. Following the war he moved to Moscow, where in 1881 he became a lecturer at the University of Moscow, and in 1884 was a professor of hygiene and director at the institute of hygiene. Erismann was a pioneer of scientific hygiene in Russia, and sought to improve water quality and food standards in St. Petersburg and Moscow. At the University of Moscow, one of his students was playwright Anton Chekhov. In 1896 Erismann was dismissed from his position at Moscow for political reasons, as he expressed support of student revolutionaries and denounced the living conditions of the Russian people. Afterwards, he returned to Switzerland and became involved with political and health issues in Zurich. References Famous Figures in Russian Medicine (translated biography) Swissworld.org St. Petersburg doctors N.A. Semashko. 'Friedrich Erismann, The Dawn of Russian Hygiene and Public Health.' Bulletin of the History of Medicine. June 1916, Vol. XX, No. 1, pp. 1-9. Persondata Name Erismann, Friedrich Alternative names Short description Date of birth 14 November 1842 Place of birth Date of death 13 November 1915 Place of death This biographical article related to medicine is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.v · d · e