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The word boula can refer to at least four different drums played in the Caribbean music area. The Guadeloupan boula is a hand drum, similar to the tambou bèlè, and is used in gwo ka and special occasions likes wakes, wrestling matches and Carnival celebrations. It is a hand drum that plays low-pitched sounds and is played single-handed and transversally.[1] The boula of Carriacou is also a hand drum, now most often made of rum casks. It is also called the tambou dibas, and is used in the Big Drum tradition.[2][3] The Haitian boula is a cowskin hand drum used in rada music.[4] The boula of Trinidad and Tobago accompanies the stick-fighting dance called kalenda, and is a double-headed barrel drum, played open-handed.[5] References ^ Guilbault, Jocelyne (1999). "Guadeloupe". Garland Encyclopedia of World Music, Volume Two: South America, Mexico, Central America, and the Caribbean. Routledge. pp. pp 873–880. ISBN 0-8153-1865-0.  ^ McDaniel, Lorna (1999). "Grenada". Garland Encyclopedia of World Music. Volume 2. Routledge. pp. pp 865–872. ISBN 0-8153-1865-0.  ^ "Tombstone - Big Drum - Saraca". Paradise Inn. http://www.paradise-inn-carriacou.com/tombstone.php. Retrieved September 10, 2005.  ^ Gaston Jean-Baptiste. "Tanbou". Haitian Drums. Archived from the original on February 23, 2007. http://web.archive.org/web/20070223154500/http://www.bongamusic.com/drums.html. Retrieved March 10, 2007.  ^ McDaniel, Lorna (1999). "Trinidad and Tobago". Garland Encyclopedia of World Music, Volume Two: South America, Mexico, Central America, and the Caribbean. Routledge. pp. 952–967. ISBN 0-8153-1865-0.