Your IP: 18.205.176.85 United States Near: Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States

Lookup IP Information

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Next

Below is the list of all allocated IP address in 166.89.0.0 - 166.89.255.255 network range, sorted by latency.

For other uses, see Battle of Kolberg. Siege of Kolberg (1807) Part of the War of the Fourth Coalition Former battle memorial with statues of Nettelbeck and Gneisenau in Kolberg Date March to July 2, 1807 Location Kolberg, Prussian Pomerania (modern Kołobrzeg, Poland) Result Inconclusive, siege lifted by peace treaty Belligerents French Empire Kingdom of Italy[1] Duchy of Warsaw Confederation of the Rhine[2] Saxe-Coburg-Saalfeld Saxe-Gotha-Altenburg Saxe-Meiningen[3] Saxe-Hildburghausen Saxe-Weimar-Eisenach Kingdom of Württemberg [1] Prussia Commanders and leaders Marshall Victor Antoni Paweł Sułkowski[4] Loucadou Gneisenau Nettelbeck Schill v • d • e War of the Fourth Coalition Schleiz – Saalfeld – Jena-Auerstedt – Lübeck – Greater Poland – Golymin – Pułtusk – Stralsund – Eylau – Ostrołęka – Kolberg – Danzig – Heilsberg – Friedland The Siege of Kolberg was a siege of Kolberg (Kołobrzeg) in the Prussian province of Pomerania from March to July 2, 1807, during the Napoleonic Wars. After Prussia lost the Battle of Jena-Auerstedt in late 1806, French troops marched north into Pomerania. Fortified Stettin (Szczecin) surrendered without battle, and the province became occupied by the French forces. Only fortified Kolberg resisted, and the French laid a siege in March 1807. Ferdinand von Schill was among the defendants. The Kolberg burghers also actively participated led by Joachim Nettelbeck. In late April, major August Neidhardt von Gneisenau replaced Loucadou's command. The troops in the town were supplied and via Kolberg's port, which was successfully defended. The siege was not successful and was lifted only when Prussia surrendered to Napoleon Bonaparte in the Peace of Tilsit in July 2.[5] Aiding the siege were troops from the Polish state of Duchy of Warsaw from the 3rd Infantry Division under the leadership of Colonel Antoni Paweł Sułkowski. Sulkowski in his diaries wrote that Polish soldiers were highly excited about the prospect of taking the city, as it was part of Poland before during Piast dynasty.He wrote "our soldiers burn with the enthusiasm to move our borders to the pillars of Bolesław", and noted that the chaplain of the Polish soldiers Ignacy Przybylski called upon them Polish soldiers. We are camped under Kołobrzeg. Since the time of Chrobry our regiment formed in Poznan and Gniezno Voivodeships is the first to show its banners here [6]. The Nazi propaganda movie Kolberg, which was begun in 1943 and released in 1945 near the end of World War II was based on this event. Today the city of Kołobrzeg has a street named after Antoni Paweł Sułkowski who led the Polish troops during the siege. References ^ a b Wörner, Nadine (2004). "Süddeutschland in den Revolutions- und napoleonischen Kriegen" (in German). p. 15. http://books.google.de/books?id=ZZypH9jamc8C&pg=PA15&dq=Kolberg+1807+w%C3%BCrttemberg&hl=de&ei=R45iTPu2MI_LOLK3wL4M&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=7&ved=0CFMQ6AEwBg#v=onepage&q=Kolberg%20&f=false.  ^ Hemmann, Thomas (2009). "Manresa-Das Tagebuch des gotha-altenburgischen Majors Knauth über seinen Feldzug in Katalonien 1810" (in German). p. 9. http://books.google.de/books?id=pCPdsAElNo8C&pg=PA10&dq=Kolberg+1807+rheinbund&hl=de&ei=gJViTMuFOpDQjAe89bC8CQ&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=4&ved=0CDwQ6AEwAzgK#v=onepage&q=Kolberg%201807%20rheinbund&f=false.  ^ Burgdorf, Wolfgang (2006). "Ein Weltbild verliert seine Welt" (in German). Oldenbourg. p. 58. http://books.google.de/books?id=wGj9qZxUnUsC&pg=PA58&dq=Kolberg+1807+rheinbund&hl=de&ei=gJViTMuFOpDQjAe89bC8CQ&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=3&ved=0CDYQ6AEwAjgK#v=onepage&q=Kolberg%201807%20rheinbund&f=false.  ^ Official site of the city of Kołobrzeg-History section ^ Werner Buchholz, Pommern, Siedler, 1999, p.360, ISBN 3886802728 ^ Napis. Tom poświęcony literaturze użytkowej i okolicznościowej Janusz Maciejewski Latona, 2005 pages 159-160 v • d • e History of Pomerania 10,000 BC–600 AD · 600–1100 · 1100–1300 · 1300–1500 · 1500–1806 · 1806–1933 · 1933–1945 · 1945–present   Administrative Western Pomerania and Farther Pomerania (before 1945) Billung March · Northern March · Principality of Rugia · Duchy of Pomerania (House of Pomerania · List of Dukes · Cammin · Gützkow · Schlawe-Stolp · Lauenburg-Bütow · Partitions · P.-Stolp) · Swedish Pomerania · Brandenburgian Pomerania (Draheim) Pomerania Province (1815-1945) (Neumark · Posen-West Prussia · List of placenames) · Mecklenburg-Vorpommern Zachodniopomorskie (after 1945) Szczecin Voivodeship · Koszalin Voivodeship · Słupsk Voivodeship · West Pomeranian Voivodeship Pomerelia Kashubia Medieval duchies (Samborides) · State of the Teutonic Order · Royal Prussia · West Prussia · Polish Corridor · Free City of Danzig · Reichsgau Danzig-West Prussia · Pomeranian Voivodeship (Kashubian placenames)   Ecclesiastical Roman Catholic Conversion of Pomerania · Diocese of Kolberg (hist.) (Congress of Gniezno) · Diocese of Cammin (hist.) · Diocese of Roskilde (hist.) · Diocese of Włocławek (Leslau) (hist.) Archdiocese of Berlin · Archdiocese of Szczecin-Kamień · Diocese of Koszalin-Kołobrzeg · Diocese of Pelplin Protestant Protestant Reformation · Pomeranian Evangelical Church   Demographical Archaeological cultures Hamburg · Maglemosian · Ertebølle-Ellerbek · Linear Pottery · Funnelbeaker · Havelland · Corded Ware · Comb Ceramic · Nordic Bronze Age · Lusatian · Jastorf · Pomeranian · Oxhöft (Oksywie) · Willenberg (Wielbark) · Gustow · Dębczyn (Denzin) Peoples Gepids · Goths · Lemovii · Rugii · Vidivarii · Vistula Veneti · Slavic Pomeranians · Prissani · Rani · Ukrani · Veleti · Lutici · Velunzani · German Pomeranians  · Kashubians  · Poles  · Slovincians Major demographic events Migration Period  · Ostsiedlung  · WWII flight and expulsion of Germans  · Post-WWII settlement of Poles and Ukrainians Languages and dialects West Germanic Low German: Low Prussian and Pomeranian (Mecklenburgisch-Vorpommersch · East Pomeranian) · Standard German West Slavic Polabian† · Polish · Pomeranian (Kashubian · Slovincian†)   Treaties Kremmen (1236) · Landin (1250) · Soldin (1309) · Templin (1317) · Stralsund (1354) · Stralsund (1370) · Thorn (1411) · Soldin (1466) · Thorn (1466) · Prenzlau (1448/72/79) · Pyritz (1493) · Grimnitz (1529) · Stettin (1570) · Franzburg (1627) · Stettin (1630) · Westphalia (1648) · Stettin (1653) · Labiau (1656) · Wehlau and Bromberg (1657) · Oliva (1660) · Saint-Germain-en-Laye (1679) · Lund (1679) · Stockholm (1719/1720) · Frederiksborg (1720) · Kiel (1814) · Vienna (1815) · Versailles (1919) · Potsdam (1945)