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Jack Jones Personal information Full name John Phillips Jones Date of birth 2 March 1886(1886-03-02) Place of birth Pontymoile, Wales Date of death 19 March 1951(1951-03-19) (aged 65) Place of death Llantarnam, Wales School Christ College, Brecon Notable relative(s) Tuan Jones, brother Ponty Jones, brother Rugby union career Playing career Position Centre Amateur clubs Years Club / team 1902-1908 1903 1905-1911 1908-1910 1909 1910-1921 1913 Pontypool RFC Christ College, Brecon Monmouthshire Newport RFC London Welsh Pontypool RFC Barbarians National team(s) Years Club / team Caps (points) 1908-1921 1908-1910 Wales[1] British Isles 14 6 (18) (7) John "Jack" Phillips Jones (3 March 1886 – 19 March 1951) was a Welsh international centre who played club rugby for Pontypool Rugby Club and Newport Rugby Football Club. He won 14 caps for Wales and was known as The Prince of Centres. Contents 1 Rugby career 1.1 International matches played for Wales 2 Bibliography 3 References // Rugby career John 'Jack' Phillip Jones was born in Pontymoile, Pontypool in 1886, to David Jones and his wife Margaret (née Phillips). Jones was one of four brothers, who would all eventually play for Pontypool Rugby Club. Two of his brother, David and James, would, like Jack, eventually play international rugby for Wales. The Joneses along with the Goulds are the only family to provide three brothers to the Welsh international rugby union team.[2] Jones was first capped, at centre, making his debut against Australia in December, 1908. He would play for Wales a further 13 times and would probably have been capped far more times but for the cessation of international rugby during the years of the First World War. Jones would play in two British Isles tours. The first was part of Arthur Harding's 1908 tour of Australasia, the second was to South Africa in 1910. International matches played for Wales Wales[3]  Australia 1908  England 1909, 1910, 1912, 1921  France 1909, 1910, 1912, 1913, 1920[4]  Ireland 1909, 1913, 1920  Scotland 1909 British Isles  New Zealand 1908, 1908, 1908  South Africa 1910, 1910, 1910 Bibliography Smith, David; Williams, Gareth (1980). Fields of Praise: The Official History of The Welsh Rugby Union. Cardiff: University of Wales Press. ISBN 0-7083-0766-3.  Thomas, Wayne (1979). A Century of Welsh Rugby Players. Ansells Ltd.  References ^ Welsh Rugby Union player profiles ^ Thomas (1979), pg 50. ^ Smith (1980), pg 468. ^ Rugby Relics player profile v • d • e British and Irish Lions – 1910 South Africa tour Forwards Smyth (Newport) (c.) · Tyrrell (Queen's University) · Smith (Richmond) · Waller (Newport) · Reid-Kerr (Greenock Wanderers) · Stevenson (St. Andrews University) · Speirs (Watsonians) · Crean (Liverpool) · Jarman (Newport) · Piper (Cork Constitution) · Robertson (Edinburgh University) · Pillman (Blackheath) · Ashby (Queen's College) · Handford (Kersal) · Richards (Bristol) · Webb (Abertillery) Backs Williams (Newport) · Baker (Newport) · Plummer (Newport) · Neale (Bristol) · Foster (City of Derry) · Timms (Edinburgh University) · Jones (Pontypool) · Spoors (Bristol) · Wood (Leicester) · Humphreys (Tynedale) · Isherwood (Cheshire and Sale) · Milroy (Watsonians) Coach Rees and Cail v • d • e British and Irish Lions team captains To 1910  Apr-Aug 1888: Robert Seddon Note 1 •  Aug-Oct 1888: Andrew Stoddart Note 1 •  1891: Bill Maclagan  •  1896: Johnny Hammond  •  Jun 1899: Matthew Mullineux Note 2 •  Jun-Aug 1899: Frank Stout Note 2 •  1903: Mark Morrison  •  Jun-Jul 1904: David Bedell-SivrightNote 3  •  Jul-Aug 1904: Teddy MorganNote 3  •  1908: Boxer Harding  •  1910: John RaphaelNote 4  • To present  Jun-Jul1910: Tommy SmythNote 5  •  Aug 1910: Jack JonesNote 5  •  Aug-Sep1910: Tommy SmythNote 5  •  1924: Ronald Cove-Smith  •  1927: David MacMyn  •  1930: Doug Prentice  •  1936: Bernard Gadney  •  1938: Sam Walker  •  1950: Karl Mullen  •  1955: Robin Thompson  •  1959: Ronnie Dawson  •  1962: Arthur Smith  •  1966: Mike Campbell-Lamerton  •  1968: Tom Kiernan  •  1971: John Dawes  •  1974: Willie John McBride  •  1977: Phil Bennett  •  1980: Bill Beaumont  •  1983: Ciaran Fitzgerald  •  1986: Colin Deans  •  1989: Finlay Calder  •  1989: Rob Andrew  •  1993: Gavin Hastings  •  1997: Martin Johnson  •  2001: Martin Johnson  •  May-Jun 2005: Brian O'DriscollNote 6  •  May 2005: Michael OwenNote 6  •  Jun 2005: Martin CorryNote 6  •  Jul 2005: Gareth ThomasNote 6  •  2009: Paul O'Connell  • Notes Note 1: Robert Seddon died on tour after a boating accident, Andrew Stoddart, became captain for the remainder of the tour. Note 2: Matthew Mullineux decided that after losing the first test that he should withdraw from further test matches, handing on field captaincy to Frank Stout, but remained tour captain. Note 3: David Bedell-Sivright was injured during the first test. Teddy Morgan took over captaincy on the field but Bedell-Sivright remained tour captain. Note 4: The team that John Raphael captained was not selected by the four Home Nations governing body, but had been organised by Oxford University and billed as the English Rugby Union team. However, it was denoted as the Combined British team by its Argentine hosts because it also included three Scots. Note 5: Jack Jones captained the first test only, but Tommy Smyth remained the tour captain. Note 6: Michael Owen captained the Lions in the first tour game, the test vs. Argentina in Cardiff. Brian O'Driscoll was injured at the beginning of the first test. Martin Corry and Gareth Thomas took over captaincy on the field but O'Driscoll remained tour captain. Persondata Name Jones, Jack Alternative names Short description Date of birth 2 March 1886 Place of birth Pontymoile, Wales Date of death 19 March 1951 Place of death Llantarnam, Wales