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PSR J1903+0327 {{{image}}} {{{caption}}} Observation data Epoch {{{epoch}}}      Equinox Constellation {{{constell}}} Right ascension {{{ra}}} Declination {{{dec}}} Observation data Epoch {{{epoch}}}      Equinox Constellation {{{constell}}} {{{component1}}} Right ascension {{{ra1}}} Declination {{{dec1}}} Apparent magnitude (V) {{{appmag_v1}}} {{{component2}}} Right ascension {{{ra2}}} Declination {{{dec2}}} Apparent magnitude (V) {{{appmag_v2}}} Observation data Epoch {{{epoch}}}      Equinox Constellation {{{constell}}} {{{component1}}} Right ascension {{{ra1}}} Declination {{{dec1}}} Apparent magnitude (V) {{{appmag_v1}}} {{{component2}}} Right ascension {{{ra2}}} Declination {{{dec2}}} Apparent magnitude (V) {{{appmag_v2}}} {{{component3}}} Right ascension {{{ra3}}} Declination {{{dec3}}} Apparent magnitude (V) {{{appmag_v3}}} Characteristics Astrometry Orbit Details Position (relative to {{{primary}}}) Other designations {{{names}}} Database references This article needs additional citations for verification. Please help improve this article by adding reliable references. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (April 2009) PSR J1903+0327 is a millisecond pulsar in a highly eccentric binary orbit.[1] The pulsar was discovered in an ongoing L-band (1.4 GHz) survey with the 305 m diameter Arecibo radio telescope.[2] The pulse period is 2.15 ms. Analysis of the pulse timing residuals shows a binary orbit with a period of 95.17 days, and a high eccentricity, e = 0.437. The mass of the companion is ~1 solar mass, while the pulsar mass is unusually large at ~1.74 solar masses. A possible near-infrared companion, KS = 18 (2.22µ), is observed in Gemini North images at its radio position. Popular theories for the formation of binary millisecond pulsars require mass transfer onto the rotating neutron star from a white dwarf companion in order to spin it up to periods less than about 10 ms—a process expected to be accompanied by strong tidal forces, producing a highly circular orbit. PSR J1903+0327 appears to require a different formation mechanism. Its large mass may also constrain the equation of state for nuclear matter at high densities. References ^ Champion, David J.; et al., S. M.; Lazarus, P.; Camilo, F.; Bassa, C.; Kaspi, V. M.; Nice, D. J.; Freire, P. C. C. et al. (2008). "An Eccentric Binary Millisecond Pulsar in the Galactic Plane". Science 320 (5881): 1309–1312. doi:10.1126/science.1157580. PMID 18483399.  ^ Cordes, J. M.; et al., P. C. C.; Lorimer, D. R.; Camilo, F.; Champion, D. J.; Nice, D. J.; Ramachandran, R.; Hessels, J. W. T. et al. (2006). "Arecibo Pulsar Survey Using ALFA. I. Survey Strategy and First Discoveries". Astrophys. J. 637 (1): 446. doi:10.1086/498335.  This variable star–related article is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.v · d · e