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Anglicanism portal Frederick Focke Reese (born in Baltimore, Maryland on October 23, 1854 and died in Savannah, Georgia December 22, 1936) was the Fourth Bishop of Georgia. Reese was the 238th bishop of the Episcopal Church in the United States of America (ECUSA). Contents 1 Life 2 References 3 Sources 4 External links Life The Rt. Rev. Frederick Focke Reese Frederick Focke Reese was born in Baltimore, Maryland on October 23, 1854. He was graduated from the University of Maryland and Berkeley Theological Seminary before his ordination to the priesthood in 1877.[1] He served as an Episcopal priest in Baltimore, Virginia and for Christ Church in Macon, Georgia before becoming the Rector of Christ Church, Nashville. In February 1908 the Diocese of Georgia met in convention in Augusta to elect the Rev. Frederick Focke Reese as the fourth Bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of Georgia and the first after the diocese was split into the Dioceses of Georgia and Atlanta in 1907. He was consecrated in Christ Church, Savannah on May 20, 1908. That spring of 1908, poor health caused the newly elected bishop to take an extended leave of absence, resuming ecclesiastical duties April 1, 1909. During his tenure as Bishop, the missionary work of the Diocese concerned the creation of new missions for blacks. By 1913, there were two predominantly black parishes in the Diocese, St. Athanasius Church, Brunswick and St. Stephen's, Savannah, as well as thirteen predominantly black missions.[2] On the twentieth anniversary of his consecration, at the convention in 1928 Bishop Reese asked about disappearing communicants noting the 5,290 person he had confirmed in 20 years. He said, Are we so unconcerned or so powerless that we can do nothing?...We must be aggressively, though wisely, on the offensive.[3] He went on to encourage lay persons to a "lay ministry of personal evangelism." In the year of his retirement, 1934,[4] the Diocese had its highest number of confirmations to date at 319. He died in Savannah on December 22, 1936. The Episcopal camp on Saint Simons Island was named in his honor. After that was sold and the camp and conference center was moved to its current location on Honey Creek in Camden County, the dining hall at that new facility was named the Reese Dining Hall for the Rt. Rev. F.F. Reese. He was succeeded by Middleton S. Barnwell as Bishop of Georgia. References ^ The Episcopal Church in Georgia 1733-1957, by Henry Thomas Malone, published by The Protestant Episcopal Church in the Diocese of Atlanta, 1960 ^ The Episcopal Church in Georgia 1733-1957, by Henry Thomas Malone, published by The Protestant Episcopal Church in the Diocese of Atlanta, 1960 ^ The Episcopal Church in Georgia 1733-1957, by Henry Thomas Malone, published by The Protestant Episcopal Church in the Diocese of Atlanta, 1960 ^ The Episcopal Church in Georgia 1733-1957, by Henry Thomas Malone, published by The Protestant Episcopal Church in the Diocese of Atlanta, 1960 Sources The Episcopal Church in Georgia 1733-1957, by Henry Thompson Malone published by The Protestant Episcopal Church in the Diocese of Atlanta, 1960 External links Honey Creek, the Camp and Conference Center of the Episcopal Diocese of Georgia has the Reese Dining Hall named in honor of the Rt. Rev. F.F. Reese. Persondata Name Reese, Frederick F. Alternative names Short description Date of birth October 23, 1854 Place of birth Date of death December 22, 1936 Place of death